Tuesday, December 31, 2013

Interview with Kay Poiro

We're certainly glad Kay was still on the mailing list when the Silly Tree email went out as well.

________________________________________________________________



1.      Do you see writing as a career?

Most definitely! I work it like a job. 40 hours a week.

2.      Where did you get the idea for this story to be published in ST's first anthology?

"Treasures and the Like" is part of a trilogy. The idea came from a worn, but well-loved toy I saw in an antique store. I wondered about the stories that toy could tell.

3.      How do you stay motivated?

I stay motivated by keeping an idea notebook. Any idea that I think might work in a story, I jot it down. 

4.      Where did you hear of Silly Tree?

The facilitator of my first writing group sent out an email blast. I haven't lived near her in years, but thankfully I'm still on her email list.

5.      Do you write an outline before every book you write?

Sometimes I do. Most of the time, I'll start writing and when I've written myself into a corner, I'll go back and make an outline.

6.      Have you ever hated something you wrote?

Yes! Most of the stream of consciousness poetry I wrote in college in my Jack Kerouac phase

7.      What inspired you to write your first story/book/poem?

I read Stephen King's "It" when I was thirteen, but I thought the ending sucked. So, I re-wrote the ending. It was sixty pages that I had every intention of sending to him to offer to his fans as an alternate ending!

8.      Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

I'm a comedy writer by nature, so I find it difficult to write about anything "serious." When I do write a dramatic piece, it ends up peppered with jokes. 

9.Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

My favorite author is Stephen King. What strikes me about his work is his ability to spin horrific tales out of the fears of our most basic fears. To me, "It" wasn't about a clown, it was about folks turning a blind eye to evil. "Pet Semetary" wasn't about cats coming back to life, it was about knowing when to let go. 

No comments:

Post a Comment