Friday, September 20, 2013

Interview with Amber Gabbitas



Amber’s story is horror in the true form. It goes to show that sometimes we can go too far in our aspirations, and that we should think before we act. Enjoy the interview with Amber below.
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1. What is your favorite genre to write?

I like to write horror. It's the genre of consequences from bad choices. Honesty told through the illusion of a lie.   

2. Who is your biggest supporter as far as writing goes?

It's impossible to think of just one person. But to narrow it down there is my husband, my siblings, and everyone in the Cache Chapter of League of Utah Writers. 

3. Tell us about your story in the Scared Spitless anthology.

Everyone is young and dumb at least once in their lives. They get a little over their heads and undergo an experience that creates who they become as adults. Fresh Skin is about a young woman undergoing that time in her life. 


4. When did you realize you wanted to be a writer?

It started when I was a child and loved being read to. So many stories to read and share, to be part of that is a fantastic dream I've never woken up from.

5. Do you view your writing as a career or hobby?

Neither, more of a life. Like breathing, it's a need more than anything else. 

6. What inspired the story that will be in the Scared Spitless anthology?

A crazy trip I took when I was 18 to Hollywood California. Someday that story will see the light and be shared with readers.

7. Have you won any contests or awards for your writing?

I've received honorable mentions in the League of Utah Writers.  

8. How do you stay motivated?

I'm a writer, and I might as well get good at it since I'll be doing it anyway.   

9. Do your stories contain inspiration from real life?
 
Every story contains a truth of life, otherwise it's not worth reading or writing -- at least that's what I believe. There is inspiration everywhere and I soak it up to write it later. 

10. Would you like to share a bit about your current work in progress?

Effie and Nina, half-sisters, are inseparable, but then the carnival comes to town. Effie follows a boy and her life is soon in danger. Nina must save her sister, but then Death has other plans for the girls.  
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Monday, September 16, 2013

Interview with Janis Lein



We are excited to have your story in the anthology, too, Janis. It is a wonderfully imaginative piece. Thank you for a wonderful interview. 
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1. Where have you been published?

I have been published a few times in Underneath the Juniper Tree, a delightfully dark literature magazine for children.

2. What is your favorite genre to write?

I love writing scary stories for children. When I was a kid, I couldn’t get enough of them, even though it made it almost impossible to fall asleep each night. I loved the rush that came when things that normally felt safe suddenly seemed strange and creepy. I like to revisit that feeling now by writing stories that I would have loved when I was young.

3. Who is your biggest supporter as far as writing goes?

My family and close friends are very supportive, but I would say my boyfriend is my biggest supporter. He is always excited to hear my ideas and read what I’m working on.

4. Tell us about your story in the Scared Spitless anthology.

My story is about a young girl who encounters her doppelganger one evening and receives a strange invitation. I started out with a very simple idea, but the story grew to something much more interesting as I was writing.

5. When did you realize you wanted to be a writer?

I’ve always loved writing things down. I’ve kept journals of my thoughts since I was 8 years old. It was only in the past few years that I started crafting my ideas into stories.  

6. Do you view your writing as a career or hobby?

For now, writing is a hobby. It’s my creative outlet. It can be a lot of fun, but also very difficult and frustrating at times. I have a lot of respect for those who do it as a career.

7. What inspired the story that will be in the Scared Spitless anthology?

This story was inspired by the many evenings I spent, as a child, getting creeped out by my own reflection in the bathroom mirror. Something about her just didn’t seem quite right…

8. How do you stay motivated?

My critique group definitely keeps me motivated. Whenever I find myself in a rut, their feedback helps me to keep going. They know exactly what I’m going through and push me to be a better writer.

9. Do your stories contain inspiration from real life?

A lot of my story ideas come as a result of my overactive imagination. It is rare that I get through an evening without an unexpected creak or shadowy shape evoking a creepy idea or two.

10. Where did you hear about Silly Tree Anthologies?
 

I was lucky enough to stumble upon Silly Tree Anthologies one day on the Internet. I read the call for submissions and thought immediately of submitting this story. At the time, it was unfinished and still needed a lot of work. So when I saw that the deadline was the next day, I freaked out a bit. But with some hard work and a LOT of revising, I got it in on time. I am very excited that my story will be included in this anthology!
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Friday, September 13, 2013

Interview with David Repsher



We loved David’s story! The premise is enough to scare anybody, and the creativity really knocked our socks off. Please enjoy our interview with David Repsher.
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1.Tell us about your story in the Scared Spitless anthology.

“Hobbies” is about the demise of one serial killer and the birth, possibly, of another serial killer—or could he be called “Hero?”

2.What inspired the story that will be in the Scared Spitless anthology?

Like George Lance in my story, I was scared to death of the evening news as a kid. There seemed to be nothing but people killing people: wars and murders everywhere. The wars were a world away, but the murders were close to home. I was in constant fear of someone I know being murdered. To my young mind, the most heinous type of murder was rogue hitchhikers, in an ultimate betrayal of trust, killing the Good Samaritan drivers who picked them up. There seemed to be a lot of hitchhiker murders going on, and I started thinking about ways to turn the tables on the hitchhiker if I ever got into that situation as an adult. So this story was actually developed over a few decades.

3.When did you realize you wanted to be a writer?

When I was fifteen, I purchased The Eagle Has Landed by Jack Higgins at a yard sale for twenty-five cents. It was my first “adult” novel and from the first page, I was hooked. After I finished the book, I searched for similar novels, but was generally disappointed (unfairly, looking back now) in either the subject matter, or the author’s style. So, I just decided that if I couldn’t find anyone to write what I liked, I would do it myself!

4.At what age did you write your first story?

I guess I was in the fourth grade when the writing bug bit me. We were studying the Feudal System and were required to write a paper about it. Instead of writing a dry book-report-type paper like everyone else, I wrote it more in the style of a fiction story, allowing my imagination to take over and create a story around the facts. The teacher said she loved my originality and read my paper out loud to the class.

5.Do you view your writing as a career or hobby?

Definitely a hobby. Hobbies are for pleasure, careers are for work. I get much more pleasure from my writing than a feeling of work.

6.How do you stay motivated?

That’s hard to say. I can’t stay motivated unless the words come easily. Most of the time when I sit down to write, I relax and let the story take me where it’s supposed to go. When that happens, it’s easy to stay motivated. However, when it feels like I’m forcing the words onto the page, my motivation takes a hike. I hate when that happens.

7.Do your stories contain inspiration from real life?

Sure. Most of my characters are based, at least a little, on someone I have actually known. Most situations, unless they’re really “out there,” have some basis in my real life. I’m always amazed at how inspiration pops up from my everyday life.

8.Would you like to share a bit about your current work in progress?

I’m working on a book of short stories showing the world of the 1970s through a thirteen-year-old boy’s eyes. They are, of course, somewhat autobiographical, as I pull inspiration from my own teenage years, but they are more along the lines of how I would have liked it to be rather than the way it was.

9.What is your favorite genre to write?

I’ve written in just about all genres—maybe even creating a few new genres along the way—but I seem to gravitate to horror and thrillers. I’m an avid horror film fan and can’t seem to get enough, so it seems I always come back to that genre when I start writing.

10.Is there anything else you’d like to share with us?

I have written and illustrated a children’s book called Woodrow’s Waggish Wish, which has been published in New Zealand.

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